(Temecula, California) – How will gold, silver and other precious metals perform in 2012?

Year-end predictions by experts with decades of experience in buying and selling gold, silver and other bullion coins with the public almost unanimously point toward price increases. However, some of their opinions significantly vary on how high the increases will go in the next three months and a year from now, according to the Professional Numismatists Guild, a half- century old, non-profit organization composed of the country’s top rare coin and bullion coin dealers that conducted an opinion poll of its members.

PNG officials report their members’ predictions on where gold will close at the end of the first quarter in 2012 ranged from a low of $1,475 per ounce to a high of $2,155, with a mean average of $1,759.57 . Their estimates for gold at the end of 2012 varied from $1,450 up to $2,575 with the average $1,976.22.

“Thirty PNG member-dealers responded to the opinion poll that was conducted between December 16 to 23, 2011,” said Jeffrey Bernberg, PNG President.

“These are professionals with an average of over 35 years each of frontline experience buying and selling American Eagles, Canadian Maple Leafs, South African Krugerrands and other precious metals bullion and rare coins with the public. Obviously, no one can accurately predict the precise future of the commodities markets, but many people have turned to precious metals and rare coins as an important part of their portfolios. With the uncertainty of world economic events, it is more important than ever to deal with reputable, experienced dealers when buying or selling.”

PNG members were asked where they think U.S. spot prices will close on Friday, March 20, 2012, and also on Monday, December 31, 2012. Here are the low and high estimates and mean averages of the dealers’ opinions on silver, gold, platinum and palladium by the end of the first and fourth quarters of 2012.

Silver, end of first quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $24.35
Highest prediction: $57.50
Mean average (30 respondents): $34.04

Silver, end of fourth quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $23.00
Highest prediction: $130.00
Mean average (28 respondents): $48.73

Gold, end of first quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $1,475
Highest prediction: $2,155
Mean average (30 respondents): $1,759.57

Gold, end of fourth quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $1,450
Highest prediction: $2,575
Mean average (28 respondents): $1,976.22

Platinum, end of first quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $1,335
Highest prediction: $2,050
Mean average (27 respondents): $1,602.64

Platinum, end of fourth quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $1,400
Highest prediction: $2,200
Mean average (27 respondents): $1,818.83

Palladium, end of first quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $515
Highest prediction: $1,012
Mean average (25 respondents): $694.03

Palladium, end of fourth quarter 2012:
Lowest prediction: $622
Highest prediction: $1,525
Mean average (25 respondents): $815.65

The Professional Numismatists Guild was founded in 1955. Membership requirements are strict, and PNG members must adhere to a strict Code of Ethics that prohibits use of high pressure sales tactics and misrepresentation of the value of items being sold. PNG members must demonstrate knowledge, responsibility and integrity in their business dealings. They also must agree to binding arbitration to settle unresolved disagreements over numismatic property. A complete list of PNG member-dealers can be found online at www.PNGdealers.com.

For a copy of the informative pamphlet, “What You Should Know Before You Buy Rare Coins,” or a printed directory of PNG member-dealers, send $1 to cover postage costs to: Professional Numismatists Guild, 28441 Rancho California Rd., Suite 106, Temecula, CA 92590. Phone: (951) 587-8300. Email at info@PNGdealers.com, or visit the web site at www.PNGdealers.com.

 

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1 Comments

  1. frank says:

    why is it , that silver has to follow golds lead to go up in value ? especially when silver has a industrial demand as well . why can’t it appreciate on its own ? tks frank

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