Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh’s recent approval of Fort Belvoir’s North Post as the official future site of the National Museum of the United States Army affirms the significance of the 2011 Army Commemorative Coins. The sale of these historic coins will help build a facility appropriate for telling the story of America’s largest and oldest fighting force.

ArmyMuseum Museum Site Selection Final Approval Renews Significance of 2011 Army Commemorative Coins“Secretary McHugh’s designation of Fort Belvoir as the official future site of the Museum gives our construction plans a boost in momentum,” said BG Creighton W. Abrams, Jr. (USA-Ret.), Executive Director of the Army Historical Foundation.

“Now more than ever, we encourage the American people to contribute to the creation of a museum that will represent the Soldiers who have safeguarded our freedom. Purchasing the 2011 Army Commemorative Coins is not only a fantastic way to show your support; it also provides a collectable with a symbolic value of sincere appreciation for the service of the America Soldier,” Abrams added.

The U.S. Army is the only branch of the military without a central, national museum to preserve its storied history. By purchasing these commemoratives, individuals will help foster appreciation and gratitude for the 30 million men and women who have worn the Army uniform since 1775.

The collectable coins, available only during the remainder of 2011, will provide buyers with a tangible representation of the Army’s service in times of peace and war, which will be captured by the galleries of the Museum when it opens its doors in 2015.

The $5 dollar gold coin, silver dollar, and copper-nickel clad half dollar are respectively themed “Army Service in War,” “Modern Army Service,” and “Army Service in Peace.”

The front of the $5 gold coin features five Soldier figures whose service from colonial times through today symbolizes the Army’s continuity of strength and readiness. The coin’s reverse includes the U.S. Army emblem and inscription, “This We’ll Defend,” to represent the unbroken history of the Army’s loyalty and commitment to defend the Nation.

The front of the Army silver dollar depicts the busts of a male and female Soldier symbolizing the worldwide deployment of the 21st century Army. The back of the coin is impressed with the Great Seal of the United States surrounded by the Army’s seven core values.

The clad half-dollar represents the Active Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve’s contributions during peacetime, to include disaster relief and humanitarian assistance and the Army’s pioneering role in early space exploration. The reverse depicts a Continental Soldier, symbolizing the Army as the first military service to defend the country. The 13 stars represent the original colonies.

“These coins signify a remarkable public tribute to every American Soldier who has served our nation in war and in peace,” noted Secretary McHugh at the time of the coins’ launch.

Pricing of the coins includes a surcharge that has been authorized to be paid to the Foundation to help finance construction of the Museum. The Foundation will receive $35 for every gold coin sold, $10 for every silver dollar sold and $5 for every clad half-dollar. All three coins are being produced in both proof and uncirculated versions. For more information on how to purchase the coins, please visit USMint.gov or call 1-(800) USA-MINT.

About The Army Historical Foundation

The Army Historical Foundation establishes, assists, and promotes programs and projects which preserve the history of the American Soldier and promote public understanding of and appreciation for the contributions by all components of the U.S. Army and its members. The Foundation serves as the Army’s official fundraising entity for the Capital Campaign for the National Museum of the United States Army. The Museum will be constructed at Fort Belvoir, Va., to honor the service and sacrifice of all American Soldiers who have served since the Army’s inception in 1775. For more information on the Foundation, the National Museum of the United States Army, and the Army Commemorative Coins, visit www.armyhistory.org.

 

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