By December 11, 2012 2 Comments Read More →

Great American Gold Coins – Dual Rarities!

By Doug Winter - RareGoldcoins.com
CoinWeek Content Partner ………

There are coins that are rare because of their grade (“condition rarities”) and there are coins that are rare because only a small number survive (“absolute rarities”). Then there are coins that are a whole different category: I call them “dual rarities.” These are coins that stand out as having an amazing combination of date rarity and grade rarity. There are not many of these and even fewer exist in the arena of United States gold coinage. In this article, I’m going to choose one coin from each denomination which I think is the ultimate dual rarity.

Before I begin, I want to establish three parameters for true dual rarity. These are as follows:

1920 S 10 pcgs67+ Great American Gold Coins   Dual Rarities!1. The coin is a rare date. Whether due to low mintage or low survival rate, the coin is not easily available, even in lower grades.

2. The coin is exceptional well-preserved for the issue. This is based not only on the date but the type. In other words, if the coin is a No Motto half eagle, it is not only exceptional for the date, it is one of the best of the entire type as well.

3. Nothing close survives. There are coins that are dual rarities but other comparable examples exist for the date or for the type. An example (non-gold) is the 1845-O Dime, ex Eliasberg, graded MS69 by PCGS. It is the best early date Seated Dime known, its a rare date and the next finest known is somewhere in the AU58 to MS61 range. Now that’s a dual rarity!

4. Only business strikes qualify. Proofs, especially near early dates, are very interesting but they were made in limited editions for collectors and we can expect these to have survived. Branch mint proofs or specimen strikes are another story and despite being controversial and slightly esoteric, I’m going to let them qualify. Its my list and I can be the Dual Rarities Czar if I want to. So there…

1. GOLD DOLLARS

This was a fairly hard denomination to choose a single coin from because there aren’t alot of truly rare gold dollars and the most famous issues (the 1849-C Open Wreath and the 1861-D) don’t have a single really memorable survivor. So with some thought, I chose a coin that I actually had in my hands the other day and which was sort of an impetus for this article: the Brand-Akers 1863 gold dollar, graded MS68 by PCGS.

The 1863 is the single rarest Philadelphia gold dollar despite a mintage of 6,200 business strike. There are a number of branch mint gold dollars with lower mintages but they not to be found in supergrades. There are 14 Philadelphia gold dollars with lower mintages than the 1863 but these tend to have been saved in higher grades. A few of the dates have incredible individual coins known (the 1864 in PCGS MS69 quickly comes to mind) but they are not as rare, overall, as the 1863.

The Brand 1863 gold dollar was purchased by famed dealer-collector David Akers as Lot 29 in Part One of the Virgil Brand auction, held by Bowers and Merena in November 1983. It sold for $15,400. Akers kept this coin as part of his personal collection until a few years ago when he sold it via private treaty to a West Coast collector who is forming an incredible, high grade set of gold dollars.

The Brand 1863 dollar is a true “wonder coin” with amazing surfaces that literally drip with luster. When I was looking at it the other day, my first comment (made out loud) was “wow, what a coin! I’d be impressed with this if it was an 1880′s date, let alone an 1863.”

As I recall, this was Dave Akers’ favorite gold dollar and that’s saying something given that he a) saw, owned or sold nearly every great gold dollar in existence and b) personally loved gold dollars and collected them with an unbridled passion.

I love this coin for many reasons. First is the fact that it is one of the most aesthetically pleasing gold dollars that I’ve ever seen and it just happens to be a rarity. Second, it is the finest known by a long shot. I have personally handled an NGC MS66 and currently own a PCGS MS65 but neither of these is even on the same planet as the Brand 1863. Third, it has a great pedigree. Virgil Brand is probably the most underrated coin collector of all time. He has a reputation today of having been a hoarder and he certainly was happier owning ten of something than just one. But as his notebooks show, he put together a wonderful, sophisticated set that was one of the greatest ever. Brand’s legacy has been further diluted by the fact that most of his coins were sold privately after his death but even the small fraction that was sold by Bowers and Merena from 1983 to 1985 was worth millions and millions of dollars. It is staggering to think what his complete collection would be worth today.

2. QUARTER EAGLES

This was an easy, easy choice for me. The most valuable quarter eagle in existence is the Gem 1796 No Stars that sold for $1,725,000 in Heritage’s 2008 FUN auction. It’s old, beautiful, rare and gorgeous. But it still isn’t my ultimate dual rarity quarter eagle. That honor belongs to….the Byron Reed 1864 quarter eagle.

Depending on whether you think the 1841 was struck in non-Proof format or not, the 1864 is either the first or second rares business strike Liberty Head quarter eagle from the Philadelphia mint and the second rarest issue of this design after the 1854-S. There are a few dozen known 1864 business strikes with most in the EF40 to AU50 range. There are exactly three known in Uncirculated which actually makes it more available than the 1865 quarter eagle but (and this is a big but) the 1864 in question is graded MS67 by NGC.

I first saw this coin in the Spink’s October 1996 sale where it brought $132,000. I desperately wanted to purchase it and even offered to do it with no commission for my two biggest clients at the time but I had no luck. It was purchased by a West Coast dealer for his client who was, at the time, putting together an absurdly cool type set with as many dual rarities included as possible. It was graded MS67 by NGC many years ago and, by today’s standards, I could easily see it in an MS67+ or MS68 holder.

You see great quality 1900-1907 quarter eagles from time to time. Not that long ago, I had a PCGS MS68 common date in stock that was an amazing coin. But it was a common date in an uncommon grade and a coin that I wouldn’t have thought twice of buying in MS67. The Byron Reed 1864 is easily the finest quality early date Liberty Head quarter eagle that I’ve seen. It is nearly perfect with lovely rich yellow-gold color, razor sharp details and that certain “look” that you only find on very, very special coins.

There are so many reasons to love this coin. Its a Civil War rarity that is a big deal even in EF grades. It has amazing eye appeal. Its pedigreed to the famous Byron Reed collection and has been sold at auction only once since Reed acquired it in the 19th century.

This coin is owned, like many of the pieces in this article, by a major collector who understands the importance of it and considers it to be among the best of his many major rarities.

3. THREE DOLLAR GOLD PIECES

This was a hard denomination to choose. I was leaning towards the Bass collection’s 1854-D but this is a raw coin that I have never actually held in my hands (I’ve just seen it behind display glass) so I don’t know if it is as great as I think it is. So, I’m going to cast my vote for a coin that is a bit more esoteric but which is easily the most valuable three dollar gold piece known: the unique branch mint proof 1855-S. This coin was last sold for $1,322,500 (as an NGC PR64 CAM ; it was recently crossed to a PCGS holder at the same grade and designation) in Heritage’s 8/11 auction.

When examining any branch mint proof, you have two ask two basic questions: is the coin really a proof and is there a compelling reason why the issue would exist as a proof. In the case of the 1855-S three dollar, the answers are both resoundingly “yes.”

I first saw this coin back in the mid-1980′s and even then, knowing a fraction of what I know today, I was totally convinced the coin was a proof. It looks just like a Philadelphia proof of this era and, if you didn’t flip it over and see the “S” mintmark on the reverse, you’d swear it was made at the Philadelphia mint. And there is a very compelling reason for this coin to exist as it is the first year of issue for three dollar pieces from San Francisco and there are known proofs for the quarter dollar and half dollar of this date.

The grade of this coin is not as absurdly high as most of the other coins on this list but, in the case of Proofs, I don’t think this is as important. Proofs are either nice or not nice; there is little aesthetic difference between a PR64 and a PR66. What really matters about the 1855-S is that it is totally unique and it has a multiple level of demand that no other three dollar gold piece, with the possible exception of the 1854-O and 1854-D, possesses. And given the fact that there are no “wonder coin” 1854-O or 1854-D threes currently known, I give the dual rarity prize for this denomination, in a rout, to the Proof 1855-S.

This coin is currently owned by an eastern collector who added it to his set of Proof Three Dollars. It is almost certainly the most comprehensive set of proofs for this denomination ever assembled and quite likely the finest as well.

4. HALF EAGLES

It took me about two seconds to choose the dual rarity that I felt was the “essence” of this denomination. It’s a coin that I have written about in glowing terms more than once and, in my opinion, it is one of the single greatest 19th century coins of any denomination. The coin is the Bass/Norweb 1864-S half eagle.

First a little background about the issue. The 1864-S is the second rarest half eagle from this mint after the excessively rare 1854-S and it is the third rarest half eagle of this design after the 1854-S and the 1875. There are around two or three dozen 1864-S half eagles and most are in low grades; typically in the VF-EF range. There is nothing even remotely close to Uncirculated for this date…with one exception and, boy, is it ever an exception.

While first attracting attention back in 1956 in Abe Kosoff’s “Melish” sale, the 1864-S half eagle really came to light when it was sold as Lot 875 in the Norweb I auction, held by Bowers and Merena in October, 1987. At the sale, Harry Bass, knowing this was a “have to have it” coin, paid a strong $110,000. It was then sold in Bass II, by Bowers and Merena in October 1999, for $178,250. Since that time, it has been off the market and, as far as I know, it is still in a southern collector’s set.

Back in 1999, this coin was graded MS65 by PCGS and I thought, even then, that the grade was very conservative. Other than some weakness of strike, I recall the Norweb/Bass 1864-S half eagle being nearly perfect and other than some later date S mint coins of this type, I also remember it being among the best Liberty Head half eagles of any date that I’ve ever seen. I’d have to think this coin would grade at least MS66 to MS67 today and with barely any other 1864-S half eagles known in grades above AU50…..well, you get the point. Dual Rarity!!!

5. EAGLES

I’m not ashamed to admit that I have bias towards pre-1900 issues when it comes to all American coins. As you’ve no doubt noticed in this article, all the coins–so far–have been dated in the 1850′s and 1860′s. Well, I’m going to go outside my comfort zone with the ten dollar denomination, especially because there is really no single Liberty Head eagle that stands out to me as a classic dual rarity (although the Eliasberg Gem Uncirculated 1850-O would be the closest thing to this…). I’m going to go into the 20th century with this denomination.

In their March 2007 auction, Heritage sold a PCGS MS67 example of the 1920-S eagle for a record-shattering $1,725,000. This coin was not only one of the single best Indian Head eagles of any date that I’ve ever seen, it was one of the two or three rarest dates in the entire series and clearly the finest known.

The 1920-S eagle is a much different issue than the other dates listed in this article. It is far more available than, say, the 1864-S half eagle and far more available in Uncirculated than all of the other issues that we are discussing. There are a few hundred 1920-S eagles and a few dozen Uncirculated pieces exist, including at least four or five Gems. But you have to approach 20th century coins differently than 19th century coins as the former tends to be more condition rarity in nature while the latter tends to be more absolute rarity. To me, the 1920-S eagle comes closest to being a true dual rarity as it is a comparably tough issue in all grades and is recognized as one of the keys within this popular series.

There’s some pretty cool background information about this coin. Steve Duckor purchased it in the June 1979 Stack’s auction for $35,000 which was alot of money for him back then and alot of money for an Indian Head eagle. He held it for nearly three decades and his timing was just right as when he sold in in early 2007, the coin market was very strong, the economy was still rolling along and, most importantly, at least three very wealthy collectors needed this specific coin for their set. I was sitting next to Steve when the coin sold and I can still remember the look on his face after it hammered. To say he looked stunned is an understatement.

Today, this coin is in the Bob Simpson collection where it is part of the finest known set of Indian Head eagles. It is now graded MS67+ by PCGS and it remains one of the most amazing coins of any denomination that I have ever seen.

6. DOUBLE EAGLES

You’re probably thinking I’m going to choose the 1933 double eagle, aren’t you. But here’s why I’m not: besides the fact that the coin isn’t theoretically legal to own (at least yet), I have the sneaky suspicion that the group that was “discovered” a few years ago in Philadelphia might not be the only ones known. Just a hunch but…

The coin I chose as my dual rarity double eagle may very well be the most valuable double eagle in existence but it is probably the least well-known single piece of the six that are featured in this article. The coin I’ve selected is the 1861 Paquet Reverse that was struck in Philadelphia. There are exactly two examples of this issue known to exist. One, graded MS61 by PCGS, sold for $1,610,000 in the Heritage 8/06 auction. The other, graded MS67 by NGC, was last sold at auction in the Norweb III sale (all the back in 11/88) for a then-strong $660,000.

This coin has an interesting back story. It features a one-year redesign by Anthony Paquet that was created in an attempt to improve the quality of strike for this issue. It failed and most of the Philadelphia strikings were melted; the San Francisco pieces of this design were actually released and over 100 are known today, mostly in lower grades.

The one thing that hurts the 1861-P Paquet double eagle is that it is a slightly obscure issue that could be considered a pattern. My arguement against this is that it is widely known enough that the vastly inferior MS61 (mentioned above) brought over $1.6 million in a market that was less appreciative of erarities (and double eagles) that what we are seeing in late 2012/early 2013.

And then there is the coin itself. It is an absolutely smashing Gem that would be a great coin even if it were a common date. It is nearly flawless with the sort of naked-eye appearance that most of the other coins on this list all have and what makes it, in my opinion, so special.

I am virtually certain that when this coin does finally sell, it will set a record price for any coin ever produced. It is currently in strong hands but when it does sell, look out for some fireworks in the auction room.

So there you have it: my list of the ultimate dual rarities. Every coin on the list is a great piece for a variety of reasons and every piece is something that a sophisticated, wealthy collector would love to own. These coins combine grade and rarity like no others do.

About the Author:

Doug has spent much of his life in the field of numismatics; beginning collecting coins at the age of seven, and by the time he was ten years old, buying and selling coins at conventions in the New York City area. Recognized as one of the leading specialized numismatic firms, Doug is an award winning author of over a dozen numismatic books and the recognized expert on US Gold. His knowledge and exceptional eye for properly graded and original coins has made him one of the most respected figures in the numismatic community and a sought after dealer by collectors and investors looking for professional personalized service, a select inventory of impeccable quality and fair and honest pricing. Doug is also a major buyer of all US coins and is always looking to purchase collections both large and small. If you are interested in buying or selling classic US coins or if you would like to have the world’s leading expert work with you assembling a set of coins? Contact Doug Winter at (214) 675-9897 or by email at dwn@ont.com. RareGoldCoins.com

2 Comments on "Great American Gold Coins – Dual Rarities!"

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  1. saul teichman says:

    Doug – have you ever seen the Norweb 1911-D Eagle ?

  2. Steven Mlaker says:

    Doug, your articles are well thought out and well written . . . . . . . for the person with an outrageous amount of money. I attended a PCGS member’s club convention in Las Vegas a few years ago (and saw you there), where Dave Hall gave the closing presentation. His recommendation to us just starting out was to buy up 19th century coins, any coins with under 10,000 mintages. He then gave out a sheet with a list of coins, many of which were quarter eagles; some of which were half eagles and a smattering of other varieties.

    My point is that these are nice coins and most can be had in MS grades in the hundreds or feww thousands of dollars. These are affordable for many a common collector.

    On the other hand, most of what you tout is like you are writing for only a closed audience of coin professionals, not for a general circulation periodical.

    Why not give the $5,000 (and $1.7 million) plus coins a rest, you have written about them over and over, to the point of being exhausting, and instead focus on what is a good value in a price range that collectors, not deep-pocket investors can buy. I’m sure there are plenty of things good you can say about quarter eagles, some of which were minted in the sub-5,000 piece range.

    Just a thought.

    You’d do your reputation and this website a real favor.

    Regards,

    SM

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